Tag Archives: Maeve Binchy

One Month Down

Today is March 31 and I have completed the first month out of the 12 I’ve allowed myself to finish the first draft of my novel.

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Progress so far:

  • 61 pages
  • working on chapter 7

Research shows:

  • writing a book is work
  • I have lots to learn as I go

Novel writing tip of the month:

  • Break the rules!!!

I have read so many blogs and articles by other writers and published authors. Everyone has their own advice on how to write a novel. I chose to stick with Maeve Binchy’s advice of writing 10 pages per week. For me this goal is doable and its rewarding because its achievable.

I can’t commit to designating a certain time of day to write and writing for 1-3 hours during that time of day. I’ve found that trying to write every night after dinner, having worked an eight hour day, is just not feasible nor enjoyable. On evenings where I was too exhausted, unmotivated or had a bad day, I skipped it. But I didn’t skip entirely! I would read about other writer’s experiences or their tips, I read part of a novel from a published author, or I wrote a blog entry. I found that by doing this, when I wrote next time, I wrote something that was ok. I didn’t force myself to just write something that would need to be re-written later anyways.

This month has been interesting so far. I’ve learned a lot about how to go about writing the damn thing (ex. characters, plot, dealing with gaps in time, organizing my ideas, etc.) and I’ve learned what works for me.

I can’t say if I’ve written 10 pages every 7 days this month (I could probably see if I went back through my author’s log- blog posts), but I do know that I’ve written 61 pages when my goal was 40 pages for this month.

So hopefully I can keep the momentum going in April.

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Book Review: Silver Wedding – By Maeve Binchy

Maeve Binchy, the Queen of Characters, has done it again with Silver Wedding; writing every character in such a way that the reader is immediately planted in the character’s shoes.

In nearly every book I’ve read by Binchy, she has multiple characters that the reader gets to know well. In Silver Wedding, the reader is given eight pairs of shoes to fit into.  Divided into chapters, each character has a very unique life in various places, but in the end they all come together for the Silver Wedding in London.

Anna is the eldest daughter of Desmond and Deirdre Doyle who are celebrating their 25th wedding anniversary. The Doyle’s are planning more than celebrating, as their marriage isn’t full of love as some might be. Anna who unhappily works at a bookstore because her boyfriend, Joe Ashe is unemployed and she needed stability.

Anna’s brother Brendan, living over in the west of Ireland, will be of no help in planning the anniversary and neither will her young sister Helen who is struggling to be accepting into the convent where lives.

Desmond Doyle working as a Special Projects Manager for Palazzo Foods started the grocery chain with his friend Frank Quigley

Father Hurley, the priest who married Desmond and Deirdre Doyle in a shotgun wedding also living in Ireland is invited to the celebration.

Maureen, Deirdre’s maid of honor and old flame of Frank Quigley has the sad situation of dealing with her mother’s recent death and another surprise she discovers as she sorts through her mother’s papers.

Frank Quigley, married to Italian Renata Palazzo, daughter of his boss finds himself in a long-term affair with Joy East, the Palazzo company’s designer.

Reading about each character in a chapter was intriguing. It let the reader fully immerse in the character and learn about who they really were. Each character had its own life with their job, their worries and the connection to Desmond and Deirdre Doyle.

The difficult part was keeping track of each character. Since each chapter was so in-depth with each character, it made it harder to remember everything about the character in the previous chapter, especially when you put the book down for a day or two. It was more like eight short stories, which were brought together in a ninth short story at the end.

In addition to keeping track of all the main characters there was:

  1. Joe Ashe, Anna’s boyfriend
  2. Janet, Joe’s ex-wife
  3. Ken Green a friendly customer in the bookshop Anna worked at
  4. Uncle Vincent whom Brenden was living with in Ireland on the farm
  5. Grannie O’Hagan (grandmother to Anna, Brenden and Helen)
  6. Grandpa Doyle, former landowner of the farm in Ireland
  7. Sister Brigid, head of the convent Helen was staying at
  8. Sister Nessa, working with young mothers
  9. Sister Maureen, working to rehabilitate ex-prisoners
  10. Sister Joan
  11. Yvonne, young mother
  12. Simon, baby boy
  13. Mr. Suresh Patel, owner of a corner shop
  14. Marigold, Australian trainee, assistant to Desmond Doyle
  15. Renata Palazzo, Frank Quigley’s wife
  16. Carlo Palazzo, father of Renata Palazzo
  17. Gregory, Father Hurley’s nephew
  18. Laure Hurley, Father Hurley’s sister
  19. Alan Black, Laura’s husband
  20. Sophie Barry, Maureen’s mother
  21. Bernard James Barry, Maureen’s father
  22. Flora Jones, Bernard’s second wife
  23. Mr. White, Sophie’s solicitor
  24. Walter, male friend of Maureen
  25. Eileen O’Hagan, Deirdre’s mother
  26. Kevin O’Hagan, Deirdre’s father
  27. Joy East, Palazzo company’s designer
  28. David, man who desires Joy East
  29. Barbara, Jack, Gerard, friends of Granny O’Hagan
  30. Tony, Granny O’Hagan’s boyfriend

In addition to the eight characters who are the focus, there are an additional 30 characters mentioned throughout the book. I may have missed a few, but this brings the counted total to 38 characters. It was hard to keep track of each person and how they fit in at the end.

This book has a table of contents at the front, but a family tree and character web may also have been helpful. Binchy could have aided the reader just a little more when she started a new chapter and referred to a character she already mentioned by giving a small reminder of who they were or only referring to the minor characters instead of naming them.

Silver Wedding brings everyone together again in the end, but it is advisable to read the book from start to finish in one sitting or at least without taking too many breaks. With all the characters, this book requires careful attention.

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